Perched on the northern edge of Pittsburgh's Hill District, August Wilson Park provides a unique view of the city

Before 2009, the status of August Wilson Park (formerly Cliffside Park) could have been described as lost but not forgotten. After witnessing years of the park’s decline and deterioration, residents rallied to preserve and reimagine this important community asset. The Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy is excited to present with Hill District community organizations and the City of Pittsburgh a completely renovated August Wilson Park!

Opened to the public on August 6th, 2016, the new August Wilson Park features a number of improvements and an expanded view of the rivers. The park plan, designed by Environmental Planning and Design, is exemplary of the Parks Conservancy’s dedication to community input throughout the planning process. The rolling, fully accessible landscape features public art inspired by neighborhood children; an installation of vintage photographs from Pittsburgh native Charles "Teenie" Harris and the Oliver M. Kaufmann Photograph Collection; and quotations from beloved Pittsburgh playwright August Wilson. This year, the most beautiful view of the city’s landscape is free and open to all.

Reimagining August Wilson Park

This is the first park project to be based on the Greenprint for the Hill District, by Walter Hood Design Studio. The Greenprint plan envisions reconnecting the people of the Hill District to their unique landscape and connecting the Hill District to the city as a whole. Produced by Find the Rivers! -- a partnership of Hill House Association, Community Partners Institute, Hill District Consensus Group, and the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy -- the Greenprint provides a practical framework for a beautiful urban landscape around which housing, commercial development, transportation, the arts, and community services can be woven. Ultimately, it envisions the Hill as a “Village in the Woods” above the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers.

The renovation of August Wilson Park is funded by a Pennsylvania Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) grant awarded to the Parks Conservancy, with major additional funding from the Eden Hall Foundation, the Ryan Memorial Foundation, McAuley Ministries, an anonymous donor, City of Pittsburgh Community Development Block Grants, and a Neighborhood Partnership Project (NPP) grant through Hill House Association. Significant individual gifts totalling $67,000 also contributed to the fundraising success of the project.

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